#Kasipedia

Today in SA History – 8 August

1. Launch of Progressive Women’s Movement of South Africa

On 8 August 2006, hundreds of women gathered in Bloemfontein to launch a new national women’s movement, a non-profit organisation called the Progressive Women’s Movement of South Africa. It was created as a platform for development for all women of SA regardless of their background. The movement enables women to speak with one voice addressing their concerns regardless of race, class and religion. On that same day, they also celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the 1956 march to the Union Buildings in Pretoria that was organised by South African women to protest against the extension of pass laws to African women by the Apartheid government.

The membership of the movement consists of more than thirty-five national organizations and institutions that present labour, political parties, business ,art and culture. It has been launched in all nine provinces of SA.

Source: SA History Online. (2017). The launch of the Progressive Women’s Movement of SA. Available here: http://www.sahistory.org.za/dated-event/launch-progressive-womens-movement-sa [Accessed 08/08/2017]

2. Beatles records were banned by the SABC

On this day in 1966, Beatles records were banned by the SABC after John Lennon sparked an outcry by saying Christianity was in decline and that the Beatles had become more popular than Jesus Christ.

Lennon had originally made the remark in March 1966 during an interview with Maureen Cleave for the London Evening Standard. When Datebook, a US teen magazine, quoted Lennon’s comments in August, five months later, extensive protests broke out in the Southern United States. Some radio stations stopped playing Beatles songs, their records were publicly burned and press conferences were cancelled. The controversy coincided with the group’s US tour in August 1966, and Lennon and manager Brian Epstein attempted to quell the dispute at a series of press conferences. Some tour events experienced disruption and intimidation, including a picketing by the Ku Klux Klan.

Source: Yfm (2016) Today in History. Available here: http://yworld.co.za/today_in_history [Accessed 08/08/2017]

3. Charges against 53 of the 76 protestors detained after the Sharpeville massacre were dropped

In 1960, charges against 53 of the 76 protestors detained after the Sharpeville massacre are dropped. The incident sparked an outcry and growing calls for the isolation of the Apartheid regime. * In 1974, US President Richard Nixon announced that he would resign over the Watergate scandal. Nixon was the 37th President of the United States. He ended American involvement in the war in Vietnam in 1973 and brought the American POWs home. The year 1973 saw an Arab oil embargo, gasoline rationing, and a continuing series of revelations about the Watergate scandal. The scandal escalated, costing Nixon much of his political support, and on August 9, 1974, he resigned in the face of almost certain impeachment and removal from office. After his resignation, he was issued a pardon by his successor, Gerald Ford.

Source: Yfm (2016) Today in History. Available here: http://yworld.co.za/today_in_history [Accessed 08/08/2017]

4. South African Government ordered the slaughter of 30 000 ostriches

In 2004, the South African Government ordered the slaughter of 30 000 ostriches in an effort to contain an outbreak of bird flu. The disease is caused by a type of influenza virus that is hosted by birds, but may infect several species of mammals. It was first identified in Italy in the early 1900s and is now known to exist worldwide. A strain of the H5N1-type of avian influenza virus that emerged in 1997 has been identified as the most likely source of a future influenza pandemic. Exports to Europe – the biggest market for South Africa’s ostrich meat – crashed after the EU banned the import of the low-cholesterol meat to stop the virus spreading.

Source: Source: Yfm (2016) Today in History. Available here: http://yworld.co.za/today_in_history [Accessed 08/08/2017]